Seminar 5: Speaker Biographies

Seminar 5: Narrative and regulatory knowledge in co-production.  

Speaker biographies

TTTricia Thorpe, Anti-stigma coordinator, facilitator of Real voices and Unheard voices of High Royds, encouraging people to share their experiences in form of storytelling, to challenge the stigma and discrimination around mental health labelling. ‘Everyone has a story to tell and we can learn by the journey that individual has taken, never be ashamed of your story it will inspire others’.

 

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Vanessa Findlay has been working with the anti-stigma team as a volunteer for the last four years. In that time she has used her lived experience in various training workshops to help individuals develop a more in depth understanding of living with a mental health problem. Beyond her volunteer work she is currently a student at Leeds Beckett University studying Psychology and Society.

 

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Mick McKeown is Reader in Democratic Mental Health, School of Nursing, University of Central Lancashire and trade union activist with Unison, playing a role in union strategizing on professional nursing. He has taken a lead in arguing the case for union organising to extend to alliance formation with service user/survivor groupings.

 

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Helen Spandler is Reader in Mental Health in the School of Social Work and an Associate of the Psychosocial Research Unit (PRU) at UCLan. She is primarily a qualitative researcher in mental health and critical social theory/policy. She is currently working on a number of research projects and is the Principal Investigator on a 2-year research project funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation on informal support. She is in the editorial collective of Asylum:the magazine for Democratic Psychiatry.

 

BSBrendan Stone is a Professor in the School of English at the University of Sheffield. His work is in the areas of social and civic engagement, teaching innovation and excellence, leadership in widening participation, and quality and diversity particularly in the fields of disability and mental health. Brendan is the founder and co-director of the University’s Storying Sheffield project, and a co-founder of the Sheffield Arts and Wellbeing Network. He is a Senior Fellow of the Institute for Mental Health, and a National Teaching Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

 

Expertise by experience

Professionals should be able to use their ‘expertise by experience’

Tina Coldham and Pete Fleischman led a workshop at the third ESRC seminar which provided an interesting historical overview of the development of co-production dating back to the dark ages in the 1980s up to the present day.  At the end, they threw out 2 questions for discussion: ‘Is it possible to truly co-produce in mental health?’ and ‘Is there a danger that co-pro will get hi-jacked?’tc

The view of the participants was that co-production is a process, a journey – there’s no alternative than to continue working away at it.  Even if co-production is being co-opted, at the very least it means that people are talking about it. Some participants explained that they witness and participate in authentic (rather than ‘watered down’) co-production – but it’s often hidden and under-acknowledged.
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Significant progress will have been made when mental health professionals feel able to be open about their own experiences of mental distress. In other words, professionals also bring expertise by experience, and this should be seen as a professional asset. As things stand, most professionals feel unable to disclose their personal experience of mental health. Until they do, we won’t achieve the ideas of ‘reciprocity’ and ‘mutuality’. Although some people don’t like these words – they are the language of co-production. So look up the words if you don’t understand them!

 Tina Coldham campaigns for a better understanding of mental health issues in society and works to improve service provision. She has enduring mental health problems, and has used used mental health services over many years. Tina has worked in the voluntary sector, across disability, in academia, with regulators and governing bodies as a trainer, researcher and consultant. Tina is currently a Director with HASCAS who conduct service reviews and homicide investigations; a member of the NIHR Involve Advisory Group and Advisory Board; Honorary Visiting Fellow in the Department of Social Policy and Social Work at the University of York; An associate at the Centre for Citizenship and Community at UCLan; and has stepped down as Chair of the National Survivor User Network having led this from the project planning stage to independence. Tina also chairs the SCIE co-production network.

 Pete Fleischmann has experience of using mental health services. Pete was coordinator of Brent Mental Health User Group (BUG) from 1991 to 1996. Until 2004 Pete worked as an independent consultant. Contracts have included working with the Service User Research Enterprise (SURE) at the Institute of Psychiatry, developing user involvement at Revolving Doors Agency. Since 2004 Pete has been Head of Co-production at the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) where he works four days per week. SCIE is a national charity set up by the government in 2002 to improve social care services. Pete leads SCIE’s programme of work around co-production. Co-production is the term SCIE uses to describe working in equal partnership with people who use services, and carers. Pete is responsible for the production of good practice materials about co-production and ensuring that users and carers are at the heart of all SCIE’s work.

 

 

Seminar 3: Contemporary Developments in Healthcare Practice

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Seminar 3 Schedule

9.30 Registration (with tea and coffee available)
10.00 Opening with John Walsh, Leeds Community Healthcare NHS Trust and Pamela Fisher, University of Leeds: co-production and power-sharing
10.30 Presentation by David Crepaz-Keay, The Mental Health Foundation
“Co-production and peer support: the challenges of moving from survivor led to co-produced”
11.15 Discussion of arising themes (with tea and coffee available)
11.45 Martin Webber, University of York
“Co-producing mental health care: introducing the Connecting People Intervention”
12.30 LUNCH
13.15 Presentation by Rebecca Hutten followed by questions and comments
“[Co-]Producing professionals and patients within the IAPT system: can it be done?”
13.30 Identification and discussion of key points arising from presentations and discussions
14.15 Tea and coffee
14.30 Round table discussion introduced by presentation led by Tina Coldham and Pete Fleischman, Social Care Institute for Excellence
“Towards co-production? Reflections on 20 years of activism”
15.30 Summary of key points and co-production poem, based on the day’s presentations and discussions by the spoken work artist/poet Adam Montgomery (aka “Ad-verse”)
16.00 Additional Networking opportunity

 

Seminar 2 Format

Please note the second seminar is now full. Should you wish to be put on the waiting list for this seminar please email esrc-co@leeds.ac.uk .

9.30 Registration (with tea and coffee available)
10.00 Bill Fulford, welcome and introduction to the collaboration between the Centre for Values Based Practice, St Catherine’s College and the Leeds University initiative on co-production. Pamela Fisher, summary of key points arising from seminar one. Housekeeping and scene setting

10.30 Presentation by Sarah Carr and Peter Ryan of the University of Middlesex. Sarah is an Associate Professor of Mental Health Research, Middlesex University and an independent mental health and social care consultant and researcher. Sarah is Co-Chair of the National Survivor User Network (NSUN) and uses her lived experience of mental distress and service use in all her work. Peter Ryan is an expert in mental health. He is currently establishing a research centre for co-production in collaboration with Sarah Carr at the University of Middlesex.

11.15 Café style discussion based on presentation
11.45 Facilitated feedback, questions and discussion of arising themes
12.15 LUNCH
1.00 Presentation by Ruth Allen followed by questions and comments

Ruth is Director of Social Work for South West London and St George’s Mental Health Trust and a Research Fellow at St George’s University of London. She is Chair of the national Social Care Strategic Network for mental health which promotes effective social work leadership in mental health and former Chair of the Mental Health Faculty of the College of Social Work.

Presentation by Philip Houghton, Gemma Stacey and James Shutt
Philip Houghton is a clinical psychologist with a particular interest in the impact of power on individuals and systems, both within and outside of the mental health systems.
Gemma is the Academic lead of the Critical Values Based Management Centre, University of Nottingham. Philip is a Clinical Psychologist and Practice Leader of the Critical Values Based Management Centre, Nottinghamshire Healthcare Foundation Trust.
James Shutt is the service manager of POhWER. Coming from an advocacy and voluntary sector perspective, he is interested in the lived experiences of people with mental disabilities.

2.00 Identification and discussion of key points arising from presentations and discussions

2.30 Round table discussion introduced by presentation (10 mins) by Ms Keeble.  Ms Keeble uses mental health services. She is a founder member of the ‘Bristol co-production group’ which has grown from its original brief to produce many collaborations, including the partnership teaching of mental health nursing students

3.30 Summary of key points and emerging focus for research applications and outputs

4.00 Additional Networking opportunity